Saturday, May 07, 2011

Labour Scotches the United Kingdom

Now it’s Scotland that matters most. Defeat for Labour north of the border is a disaster for Ed Miliband.

Worse could be in store if, as seems likely, the SNP goes ahead with a referendum on independence for Scotland.

Labour would be wiped out at Westminster and lose any chance of forming a Government for a generation if the party were deprived of its cohort of Scottish MPs.

The Scots won’t care about that. They will vote for independence if they think it’s good for Scotland.

When push comes to shove, I suspect they will think they are better off as part of the union than they would be as an obscure region of the European super-state.

But who knows? The Scots have given Alex Salmond an overwhelming vote of confidence.

That is partly because of the slump in support for Nick Clegg’s Lib Dems who are seen as propping up a Tory Government. But Labour did very badly in Scotland as well and there is no excuse for that other than a rejection of the effete Metropolitan Mr Miliband.

It would be tragic if the legacy of Cameron's first Government were the break-up of the United Kingdom but the Tories would be tempted to support the idea because it would leave them in power at Westminster for the forseeable future.

3 comments:

JoolsB said...

If the Scots were to vote for independance, it would not be a legacy of this Government as you suggest but a legacy of Blair's Government when he introduced his lopsided devolution act which deliberately left England out for pure partisan reasons. Labour have brought this on themselves. Having said that, the Scots almost certainly won't vote for independence, why should they? They've got the best of both worlds already, their own parliament making promises that the English can only dream of without having to worry about raising the money to pay for it. They may well vote SNP for their own parliament but come a General Election, they will almost certainly vote Labour to 'represent' them in a UK parliament as SNP MPs would be too small in number. It's about time they were made to choose but either way they should not have a second vote where they can also determine the outcome of the UK parliament which predominately nowadays is only there to govern England. Scottish MPs are superfluous to requirements at Westminster except to meddle in matters which don't affect them, i.e. English matters and it's about time our 'Unionist' Prime Minister, put there by the English, nowhere else, did something to end this discrimination against the English.

JoolsB said...

If the Scots were to vote for independance, it would not be a legacy of this Government as you suggest but a legacy of Blair's Government when he introduced his lopsided devolution act which deliberately left England out for pure partisan reasons. Labour have brought this on themselves. Having said that, the Scots almost certainly won't vote for independence, why should they? They've got the best of both worlds already, their own parliament making promises that the English can only dream of without having to worry about raising the money to pay for it. They may well vote SNP for their own parliament but come a General Election, they will almost certainly vote Labour to 'represent' them in a UK parliament as SNP MPs would be too small in number. It's about time they were made to choose but either way they should not have a second vote where they can also determine the outcome of the UK parliament which predominately nowadays is only there to govern England. Scottish MPs are superfluous to requirements at Westminster except to meddle in matters which don't affect them, i.e. English matters and it's about time our 'Unionist' Prime Minister, put there by the English, nowhere else, did something to end this discrimination against the English.

Chris said...

An interesting read, but it also demonstrates how repeating a particular factoid by passing it from one person to another can make people believe it to be true. I have seen similar incorrect comments by others, so this sets the record straight.

It is simply not the case that "Labour would be wiped out at Westminster and lose any chance of forming a Government for a generation if the party were deprived of its cohort of Scottish MPs". It was only in 1950 and 1964 (February and October governments), when there was a Labour majority government without a majority in England. The 1964 governments barely struggled to survive though. The 1974 administration relied on a Lib-Lab pact but no party had a majority in England (including the conservatives).

Labour's majority would have been reduced, but never eliminated except in these cases if the Scottish members were not available. In particular, all the Blair and Brown governments had a majority of MPs in England, as well as in the UK as a whole.